17 October 2008

This strikes me as not a good thing

Patriots QB Tom Brady had a second surgery on his injured knee to deal with an infection.   To me, this sounds like a wash-out, and I would think that an infection in a reconstructed knee is not a good thing.   Are there any ortho bloggers out there?

Full disclosure: I can't bring myself to care about the Patriots either way.  I don't love 'em or hate 'em.

2 comments:

Bob Chase said...

I hate to drag you down the slippery slope into every discussion relating to sports medicine, but it seems the following story might be something you could shed some light on:

"Browns may discipline Winslow"

The most curious part of the article is this:

Winslow spent three days in the Cleveland Clinic with the infection, which has been a problem for the Browns in recent years.

Why would the reporter make a point to say staph infections are a chronic problem with the Browns? This sounds like codespeak for something, like "The Cleveland Browns keep a dirty locker room," or "The Cleveland Browns training staff does not follow customary medical practices," or even "Cleveland Browns coaches encourage their players to play hurt, making them susceptible to infection."

I'm thinking the last might be the case on the basis of this article about the Jackonsville Jaguars' Jeff Novak, who sued team physicians for malpractice:

"Ex-Jag Novak gets $5.3M in malpractice suit"

Are football players more susceptible to staph infections, and why?

Jared At The Doctor Job said...

The Boston Herald is reporting today Brady has had 2 more procedures to deal with infection and is on a 6-week course of IV antibiotics.

Is this beginning to sound like MRSA? The surgeon must have been a Jets fan.

Also Bob, I did come across this:

- Browns: 6 cases of staph. (Including Kellen Winslow twice this year and then suspending him for revealing it, which is a nice touch.)

- Redskins: 5 cases of staph in a 2 year period

- Rams: 5 cases of staph in a 1 year period